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How Your Thinking Affects Your Health Part 3 of 3

Part 3 of 3 Increased emotional distress results in the release of catecholamines (substances allowing us to respond to stressors), which is damaging to the intimal endothelium (inner-most lining) of the coronary arteries. That, in turn, leads to release of free fatty acids, which results in increased platelet aggregation and lipid deposition at the site […]

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How Your Thinking Affects Your Health Part 2 of 3

Theoretical physicist David Bohm explained how virtually all thought has physiological correlates, and that the meaning we assign to material events serves as the link between energy and matter. He refers to thought as energy, and he refers to matter in this case as the body. Meaning that is simultaneously mental and physical can serve […]

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How Your Thinking Affects Your Health Part 1 of 3

  Every change in your emotional state leads to a cascade of hormones and neurotransmitter substances, and can effect changes in the shape, voltage, and biochemistry of cell membrane receptors, and those changes influence gene expression. Neuropeptides, hormones, enzymes, and dozens of other agents are directly affected by our emotional state. There are neural, endocrine, […]

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Skills Not Pills Part 2

 Simple Behavioral Changes and Physiological Functioning Even the simplest of behavioral changes such as varying our posture serve to alter cognition, emotion, and physiological functioning. For example, when we stand tall, we feel better than if we slump. When we intentionally practice maintaining good posture—this can serve as a mindfulness practice. One reason we feel […]

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Chronic Illness Q&A with Dr. B.

This question & answer column is for people living with chronic health challenges, who want to learn to increase the odds of improving their health by learning to live with mastery & wellbeing. I invite you to post your questions in the comments box below and I will answer them on a future Friday in […]

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Meaning & Purpose Improve Health

Practice Cultivating Meaning and Purpose   The terms meaning and purpose often appear together. For our discussion here, I would frame their relationship this way: acting with purpose entails taking an action that is of sufficient importance that it gives your life meaning. Living with purpose and an active search for meaning is beneficial in […]

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Cancer and Social Support

Social Support and the Immune System Psychoneuroimmunology researchers have consistently found a positive correlation between social support and the immune system. Medical researcher Dr. Janice Kiecolt-Glaser has proven that social support improves immune function and can reverse the damaging physiological effects of emotional distress. She found that social support improved leukocyte cell counts and immune function. […]

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Video: “Fighting Cancer: A Nontoxic Approach to Treatment”

Psychophysiologist Erik Peper, PhD, discusses the book he co-authored with cancer researcher Robert Gorter, MD. He describes a novel, promising, nontoxic treatment for cancer, the results of which, have been quite exciting. In line with the actual pathophysiological process of all disease, these authors view cancer as a failure of the immune system. This is […]

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Practice Humor for Health and Wellbeing

Learn to view thoughts as nothing but passing brain phenomena. For those of us living with chronic health problems, it’s important not to take ourselves and our medical situation too seriously. Worrying or agonizing about our health challenges isn’t helpful—in fact it’s deleterious to our health—so it’s highly beneficial to learn to see the humor […]

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Still More on Cognitive Fusion

An Approach to Cognitive Fusion with Beliefs During my three years of training at the Simonton Cancer Center, there were many retreat participants who claimed they were willing to do whatever it took to get well, but such a commitment was not always evident in their behavior. Often, their prognoses were optimistic and they expressed […]

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