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Why Do Cancer Rates Drop in Times of War?

War Lowers Cancer Rates? Solomon (1990) made the surprising finding that, historically, cancer rates have been much higher among soldiers in peacetime than during wartime. He discovered that being challenged and stressed can actually be good for one’s health, and that an easier life without challenge is deleterious to it. During the stress and chaos of wartime, there is always plenty to achieve; fighting to […]

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Video: “Fighting Cancer: A Nontoxic Approach to Treatment”

Psychophysiologist Erik Peper, PhD, discusses the book he co-authored with cancer researcher Robert Gorter, MD. He describes a novel, promising, nontoxic treatment for cancer, the results of which, have been quite exciting. In line with the actual pathophysiological process of all disease, these authors view cancer as a failure of the immune system. This is […]

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Video: In Your Own Hands: A Course in Self-Empowerment

Since January of 2015, I have been teaching a class in the Continuing Education Department at the College of Marin in Kentfield, California. Since January of 2016, I have been co-teaching the class with a colleague. The class makes it easier to learn the methods described in my book In Your Own Hands: New Hope […]

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Video: Social Support Reduces the Odds of Developing Cancer

In a very famous epidemiology study, one of the most referenced of its kind because of its impressive sample size, UC Berkeley researchers Dr. Lisa Berkman and Dr. Leonard Syme studied seven thousand residents of Alameda County, California. All of them were observed for a nine-year period in order to discover all the common denominators […]

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Video: Social Support Reduces the Odds of Developing Cancer

In a substantial study of three thousand breast cancer patients, all of whom were nurses, completed in 2006, researchers found that women without close friends had a mortality rate of four times that of women with a close circle of friends. In another study of 514 women, 239 were diagnosed with breast cancer. One of the results of this study was that those […]

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Video: Openheartedness and Love Confer Health

Studies by James McKay found that people who are open and friendly to strangers had half the rate of major illnesses of those who kept a cold and distant attitude toward strangers. These “affiliator types” (people who value relationships) had stronger defenses against viruses and cancer cells and their CD-4/CD8 ratios were better. CD stands […]

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Video: Meaningful Relationships Reduce Odds of Developing Cancer

In one of the longest-running prospective studies, 1300 medical students at Johns Hopkins were followed for forty years.  While at Hopkins they were given psychological tests exploring the ability of the students to have meaningful relationships.  Thirty years later, the researchers discovered that those who had developed cancer were the same ones who had reported the greatest lack of closeness in their families of origin.  Those who had developed cancer also turned […]

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Video: Social Support, Development of Cancer, and Cancer Survival

Epidemiology researchers in one study exploring the effects of social support on cancer survival, interviewed 244 breast cancer patients. The patients were asked how many people they confided in during the three months post surgery. Then they were followed for several years. The seven-year survival rate for the patients who had not confided with anyone during that three-month post surgery period was 56 percent. The survival […]

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Video: Hope Helps Kill Cancer

In a large study of oncologists, the doctors were all asked what single attribute among all the cancer patients they had ever treated, was most strongly a contributor to the patients’ recoveries from cancer. The patients had a wide variety of types of cancer. Yet, ninety percent of the queried oncologists reported that the most […]

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Video: Are Your Thoughts Making You Sick?

In the words of psychooncologist Lawrence LeShan, PhD: “Feelings affect body chemistry, which affects the development or regression of a tumor, just as body chemistry affects feelings.” In other words, what Dr. LeShan was saying was that our thought processes affect our body chemistry and those biochemical changes do influence tumor growth as well as […]

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